Friday, January 11, 2019

Escher

I spent a couple of hours viewing the exhibition Escher X Nendo - Between Two Worlds 
at the NGV.
The life of M.C. Escher (Mauritis Cornelis) born 1898, is extraordinary and began in The Netherlands. His love for illusion, impossibilities, curiosity and imagination is featured.
The exhibition covers 2 floors and several rooms.  Escher's unique artistic vision is traced through over 150 prints and drawings of pen, ink and pencil.

 Blocks of basalt along the sea
1919
Woodcut
He started first making woodcuts in early 1919 and explored the graphic power of the woodcut in works that varied greatly in style, especially in landscapes. It is a form of Art Nouveau. 


 San Gimignano, Italy
1922
Woodcut
Escher made detailed drawings in pen and ink, which he turned into a woodcut. The geometrical lines of the town's towers contrast with the rhythms of the densely patterned rolling hills and the swirling foliage of the ancient olive tree.  


 Sky and Water 1
1938
Woodcut
He was fascinated with the dynamic tension between figure and ground in tessellations and explored this in the above drawing.
Escher explained "above, the white fish silhouettes merge to form the "sky" for the birds, while in the lower half the black birds blend together to form "water" for the fishes". 

Also exhibited were installations by Oki Sato, head of the Japanese design studio nendo. He tells of his journey from architecture to designer and what he has learned from Escher. He relates to Escher's interest in optical illusions and extreme perspectives.
 Transforming House
2018
"Gathered House"
2018

Zooming House
2018


8 comments:

  1. Thank you! I will have to take a trip into town before it ends.

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  2. An absolutely fabulous exhibition. Thanks for the photos.

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  3. I really love Escher's tessellations. Might make some interesting quilts.

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  4. Thank you for the tempting overview. This is obviously an exhibition not to be missed. Woodblock is a great art form, all about texture.

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  5. My son has always been a big fan of Escher’s. Nice exhibit!

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  6. I love tessellation's and have made a quilts using them.

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