Thursday, November 1, 2018

Kuala Lumpur Sights

Checked in to the hotel at 1am Melbourne time (11pm Malaysia), didn't bother unpacking, headed straight to bed. After a good night's sleep and breakfast, walked out to the humidity. After 10 minutes of map turning around in circles, got our bearings and walked to Merdeka Square, the main area of KL history. Our transfer driver last night hinted that it was best to sight see during the morning before it became too hot. 
 Sultan Abdul Samad Building, used to be the home for several government departments. 
Completed in 1897

Victorian Fountain, brought from England and assembled with Art Nouveau tile work.



 With the majority of Malays being Muslim, there is a strong Islamic and Moroccan influence.





Masjid Jamek Sultan Abdul Samad Mosque.
The first brick mosque in the city constructed on the first Malay Burial Ground in KL.
The building is of Moghul influence architecture and heritage, featuring 3 Moghul domes, a courtyard, minarets set at a symmetrical composition of the mosque and smaller chhatris surrounding it.
National Textile Museum.
The building is distinguished by it's design of alternating red bricks and white plaster bands with an Islamic style facade with raised onion-shaped domes.











 Built in 1888, the location it now stands upon was then used as an open wet market. Set for demolition in the 1970's it was saved by local conservationists who fought to save its elegant art decor facade and historical value.

6 comments:

  1. Wonderful! I don't think I have ever seen pictures from KL before - no-one I know must have visited there until now.

    The city looks very clean from your photos. And the treadle cabinet in the textile museum is more beautiful than any I've seen here!

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  2. You certainly don't let the grass grow under your feet when you are travelling. I love seeing the architecture and tiling.
    Temperature here today was 35!!! Expected to stay in the 20s overnight. It is not pleasant.

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  3. The mosque is so overshadowed by the skyscrapers it looks like a model. What a good idea to have a textile museum, some interesting displays, pity the lighting has to be dim.

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  4. Love the tiles. Now to get my book out and read about the way they are constructed.

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  5. Some years ago, the Immigration museum had an exhibition of Malay textiles and the embroidery done with a treadle machine was incredible so that museum must be really impressive

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