Sunday, January 14, 2018

Walk to the Incinerator Gallery

Prior to viewing an exhibition of the Essendon Quilters at the Incinerator Gallery, I walked the circuit of the Maribrynong River. 7,794 steps.

 The joys of childhood, would love to have had a play on the pirate ship!!!

My car on the other side of the river......3,509 steps it took to reach it.
 The Incinerator Gallery.
Designed by Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin.
The Essendon Incinerator complex at Holmes Road, Moonee Ponds was built in 1929-1930 and operated until 1942 as a solution to the environmental and technological problems for disposing of rubbish.. The two surviving buildings comprise a large incinerator building with three incinerator units and distinctive 8m high chimney. The incinerator building is constructed of reinforced concrete and brick, rendered externally, and is dominated by its asymetrical, terracotta tiled roof. Three furnaces survive internally, largely intact


Essendon Quilters Inc.
Contemporary Quilting
Colour and Community.







Seven Sisters Raffle Quilt 2018
The public who view the quilt have been asked to give it a name.
Some very unusual names were added to the suggestion board.


Paint Chip Challenge.
My friend Sue has her beautiful entry displayed at the top left hand corner.
I think the members were given 3 paint chips in an envelope and asked to make a small quilt using those colours.

Some amazing entries.

3 comments:

  1. That was quite a walk! But a beautiful day for it, if you weather has been anything like ours today.

    The gallery looks a lot emptier than it has at previous Essendon shows - or are they using more space so everything is spread out more?

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  2. The river is looking so good, but it needs a river keeper like the Yarra to make sure it stays that way.
    Essendon Quilters showcase of their work looks wonderful. It would be good if more councils could recognise their quilting groups like this.

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  3. That walk is fantastic. I love the changing landscape as the path progresses.

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