Saturday, September 9, 2017

Les Jardin Majorelle

Jaques Majorelle (1886-1662) was a French orientalist painter and son of the famous Art Nouveau furniture designer, Louis Majorelle. He arrived in Morocco in 1917, invited by the French Resident-General, Marshal Lyautey. Majorelle was seduced by Morocco.
 Front entrance.
In 1923, he decided to live there, purchasing a vast palm grove that would become the Jardin Majorelle.


 He commissioned in 1931, the architect Paul Sinoir, to build an artist's studio in the Art Deco style, it's walls were painted in "Majorelle Blue".





 A little bit of retail therapy, not at those prices!!

The cobalt blue he used in the garden and it's buildings is named after Jaques, bleu Majorelle - "Majorelle Blue".
 He designed a garden, a living work of art composed of exotic plants and rare species collected during his worldwide travels. he opened the garden to the public in 1947, but after his death in 1962, it fell into abandon.


I sat for 1/2 an hour, enjoying the cool shade and listened to the birds.
 In 1980, Pierre Berge and Yves Saint Laurent acquired Jardin Majorelle, saving it from real estate developers. Since then the garden has been restored.
 After the death of Yves Saint Laurent in 2008, a memorial to the French fashion designer was built in the garden.





An extensive collection of cacti.

7 comments:

  1. What beautiful cacti. I do like that colour blue too.

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  2. Fantastic! I wondered if your tour might take in Majorelle. That's something I would love to see.

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  3. Brilliant! So good that the garden was rescued and restored.

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  4. So glad you saw Jardin Majorelle. I think it is a superb garden

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  5. Hard to believe there are so many cacti I am not familiar with ... and all that garden with no weeds! I was also thinking, looking at that narrow gallery, one would have a hadr time stepping back for a wider view. Good thing it wasn't a quilt show!

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  6. What a lovely blue! It is good to see that some things that are abandoned are saved by those who see the hidden beauty.

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