Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Asakusa

This morning we decided to walk the 45 minutes to Tokyo Station to catch the train to Asakusa.
As you can see the weather was magic today after yesterday's snow.
 Yukitsuri ropes are installed on the trees 1st November each year to protect the branches from the weight of the fallen snow. We came across Hibiya Park as we walked.
 The birds had fun leaving their footprints in the snow.

 Beautiful window patterns on a restaurant.
 I had read that Tokyo Station had a gallery.
It was both sides of the length of the walkway. There were 2 exhibitions of photography.
Photos of railway stations with trains throughout the world and the other world cities.
Flinders Street Station was represented, brilliant photography.
 Kaminarimon Gate, famous for it's giant lantern.
 Senso-ji Temple, oldest in Tokyo, built in 628.
In the Temple these drawers contain prayers, you buy a prayer and offer it to Buddha.
 5 story pagoda.
 Nakamise shopping street. 250 shops line the sides of the Gate.
When I was here in 2014, I visited the paper shop, these are sheets of paper, not fabric.


 This mosaic adorned the entrance to the ladies toilet.
 Asakusa is on the Sumidagawa River.
We decided to do a cruise down the river and then noticed it finished where our hotel was in Hamamatsucho. The gold symbol on the roof is the home to the Asahi Brewery Ltd.
Tokyo Skytree.
The tallest freestanding broadcasting tower in the world, 634m high.
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Postcript:
The meaning of the red memorials: 
In Japan, the forms most closely related to children and motherhood (and hence the color red) are Koyasu Kannon 子安観音 (safe childbirth) and Mizuko Kuyō Kannon 水子供養観音 (patron of departed souls, especially children lost to miscarriage, stillbirth, or abortion). Statues of these two are often decked in red by parents who are praying for a child, or by parents who are praying for the repose of their dead child.

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4 comments:

  1. How sad those little memorials seem now I know what they are for! Before they were just charming and cute.

    I thought the bird footprints were stitched designs at first glance.

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  2. As usual good photos and fascinating info

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  3. You pack so much into a day. I hope you are collecting ephemera for Fibre Arts.

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  4. So many things have patterns. Fabulous

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